The Geeky Guide to WordPress – Gutenberg in 10 Steps

As I’ve been doing this blogging thing a little while now and it seemed a good idea to pass on a few of the things that I’ve learned over the five years that I’ve been doing this. In easy and often geeky steps you’ll be taken through the steps and point out the pitfalls of taking your blog seed and growing it into something really amazing.


The Gutenberg post editor has arrived and as with all change there’s something else to learn and a few ruffled feathers. I’m just coming to grips with it myself so I thought I would be helpful and give you my bloggies a few pointers.

1. Blocks

The first thing you need to know is the Gutenberg editor is built around blocks. For those of you that don’t know Gutenberg was the father of modern printing – he transformed the world with his innovative use of blocked letters to produce pages of print that took books to the masses.

This gives a clue on the thinking with this Gutenberg editor. Everything on your posts and pages is now a block.

So, if you want some text in your post – it’s a block, picture, a block, a seperator even… is a block.

2. Adding Blocks

This is where I found I got a little unstuck at first, I think it’s improved over the last couple of months.

As you’re creating your page or post the block is highlighted in blue. When this is visible a + is seen at the top or at the bottom of the block, prompting to add a block either above or below the block you’re in.

Another way to add a block is to use the + button at the top left of the screen!

3. Changing a Block

Editing a block or deleting it is also pretty straight forward. Look for the button with three vertical dots, click on it and some options come up, from here the block can be justified, or deleted.

Also look to the left, the up down arrows change the block order or click the dots in the middle and drag the block to where you want it.

4. Block Colours

This is one of the coolest new features the Gutenberg gives the post and page maker – text and background colours. As you’re writing in the block on the right are block settings, in there is the colour settings, drop the arrow down and…

Within the block the background and text colours can be changed… just like in this block.

5. Gutenberg Tool Bar

As said before on the top left is a + to add a post but there’s more there too.

So the + in a circle is add block (important that) as we know.
There’s the arrows for undo and redo.
The little i in a circle give you this kind of information:

With the button on the right is a drop down for post navigation.

6. Post Copy

This annoyed me at first – there was not copy option for posts, it now exists, in My Blogs, go to blog posts. Find the post you want to copy, click the three dots on the right and hey presto! There’s your copy post option.

7. Text on Image

This is another cute feature I hope they’re going to do more with… Go to Add > Common Blocks > Cover.
Add the image you want.
Write in text.
I can’t yet see a way to increase the text size… that’s why I hope they’re going to work on this tool.

Aston Martin

8. The Read More Block

It may shock you to know that the read more text is now… a block! So add a block go to layout elements click on More.
Done. Simples.

9. The Drop Cap

I can make the first letter in a block big in the block settings (on the right). Click the drop cap button and Ping!

10. Reusable Blocks

This is almost the coolest part, great for making a post / site header or footer template. Create the whatever you want to create, with words pictures etc. Select it all and on your three vertical lines add it to re-usable blocks.

Give it a name

It will now appear at the bottom on your block lists. The best part about this, is if you change a reusable block, it will change it on whatever posts or pages it’s been used!

Ultimate and easy updating!


Now you know 10 things about the Gutenberg post editor, will you give it a go?
What else have you found that’s given you trouble? I know the learning curve on this is quite steep and daunting – but I can see the benefits and how this can really make your work stand out.

If you haven’t already… give it a go!


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The Geeky Guide to WordPress – The Gutenberg Editor, Pictures and More

As I’ve been doing this blogging thing a little while now and it seemed a good idea to pass on a few of the things that I’ve learned over the five years that I’ve been doing this. In easy and often geeky steps you’ll be taken through the steps and point out the pitfalls of taking your blog seed and growing it into something really amazing.


The Gutenberg editor has really landed now and is causing much of a stir. All the old ways of doing things have been messed about with and many are confused. I’m here to say to you all – don’t panic (see what I did there? Douglas Adams would have liked that). You don’t even need a towel to cry into, since my last post on the Gutenberg editor it seems WordPress have been making some changes and trust me on this, it’s making our lives easier.

I’m covering a few things in this post which I’ve heard people complain about and some things I’ve notices that are quite sweet.

1. Adding pictures to a post or page

It used to be that a picture was added inline to a post, but this is not the case anymore. Think blocks, everything from a paragraph to a title, picture is now a separate block so when you want to add a picture hover your mouse over the middle of the paragraph or other block and a + is shown.
Click that and scroll to Common Blocks, find image and then you have a familiar image upload / insert command page to use.

Images can be inserted into a block as a background with text over top like this:

Science Fiction

Again insert the block, go to common blocks and add cover. Add the image and then write in the text you want. Easy.
These text seems to be set at that size, but it’s a great creative little thing we couldn’t do before.

2. Adding the read more tag

This seems to have confused a few people, but it’s dead easy, easier than it was before…

Add a block (getting the hang of this aren’t we?) scroll to layout and add ‘More’
Done. Clean and no messing about with code.

As a little side note, as you use the blocks they appear at the top of the Add Blocks box as most used so you don’t have to hunt for them. Nice.

3. Ordering Blocks

Remember in the old editor you had a block of text before a picture and then you thought ‘crap, I want it after now!’
Gutenberg has this covered, no copy and paste move the mouse to the left side of the block and some up / down arrows appear – you can change the order. All that needs to be done is that you start thinking in blocks.

4. Copy Post

I missed this and it was annoying me, it’s not quote the same but if you want to copy a post to use as a template go to blog posts under the ‘My Blog’ settings section, find the post you want, click on the three dots and there’s a duplicate post function that works quite nicely. So now even I’m happy.


I hope this is useful, this has taken some time to get used to but seriously, setting aside some time to familiarise yourself with Gutenberg is worth it, this is a really powerful way of giving us far more creativity at our fingertips. It’s cool stuff!

Let me know how you’re finding Gutenberg and what issues you’re having!


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The Geeky Guide to WordPress – The Gutenberg Post Editor

As I’ve been doing this blogging thing a little while now and it seemed a good idea to pass on a few of the things that I’ve learned over the five years that I’ve been doing this. In easy and often geeky steps you’ll be taken through the steps and point out the pitfalls of taking your blog seed and growing it into something really amazing.


The Gutenberg post editor has arrived and as with all change there’s something else to learn and a few ruffled feathers. I’m just coming to grips with it myself so I thought I would be helpful and give you my bloggies a few pointers.

Firstly the Gutenberg editor is built around blocks. For those of you that don’t know Gutenberg was the father of modern printing – he transformed the world with his innovative use of blocked letters to produce pages of print that took books to the masses.

This gives a clue on the thinking with this Gutenberg editor. Everything on your posts and pages is now a block.


Here’s the start of this post Up at the top there’s the familiar formatting addition tools that you usually got. There are a few changes:

The ‘+’ button now add’s blocks, this includes pictures, text, separators and user defines reusable blocks. Create a re-usable block by highlighting whatever and then on the three vertical dot at the top select add to reusable blocks. One feature of this is that if you change the reusable block some time after it will also change wherever it has been used. Neat that.

The ‘i’ button gives the writer information about the post or page being written, this is where the word count now is. I have to say on this I don’t know what was wrong with the count on the bottom right – but there we are!

The funny PT symbol seems to transform blocks, I’ve not played with this yet, so if you have let me know what it does.


One thing to note is the hyperlinks tool, I’ve not really worked it out yet. I doesn’t seem to work in the same way. But if you highlight text or picture (I assume) and click the hyperlink button and paste in the link, it seems to work. 


On the right is a familiar Document settings bar, when you click on the page You get a load of options. 




YOu can change text and background colour and set text size.

Using the drop cap does this:

Drop cap

Which is nice… I’m not sure what I would use it for… but cool!


The order of the blocks can change really easily too…

On the left at the top there’s up / down arrows which shift the block order as desired. Also quite neat.


When editing and you click on the ‘+’ to add a block there’s a whole list of blocks to choose from – I’m sorry. I am not going to go through them all. I haven’t tried most of them yet. But have a play – find out what they do and you’ll soon get the hang of how it works.

At the moment I’m finding the Gutenberg editor a bit clunky, whether that’s me or this I’m not sure. I can see some of the benefits – there is one thing I really want them to add. I want to be able to copy posts, if they did that I would be a very happy man. 

This is just a little sweetener to get you going – if I get questions or feedback I might write another post on this as there is so much to it But let me know what you think and any questions you might have… I would be interested.


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The Geeky Guide to WordPress – Helpful writing tools in WordPress

As I’ve been doing this blogging thing a little while now and it seemed a good idea to pass on a few of the things that I’ve learned over the five years that I’ve been doing this. In easy and often geeky steps you’ll be taken through the steps and point out the pitfalls of taking your blog seed and growing it into something really amazing.

 


 

Call us bloggers but at the end of the day we write. Writers write and they need writing tools. Sounds easy , but how many writing tools do you know about, let alone use?

Wordpress8

If we look at the tool bar that visible during the post writing process there’s a fair bit on there. Not by Microsoft Word standards but enough to keep us happy. There’s bold, italic, justification, strikethrough and underline functions. Along with this there’s font colours and special symbols.

With clear formatting, increase / decrease indent there’s enough to do what we need. To find out which are which is fairly straightforward but for guidance hover the mouse arrow over a symbol for a few seconds and you’re told what it is.

But is that it? Nope… If you’re a shortcuts geek then you’ll like this:

CTRL + A                 = Select All

Home                       = Go to start of line

HOME + HOME      = Go to start of post

END                          = Go to end of line

CTRL + END            = Go to end of post

 

CTRL + C                = Copy selected text / media

CTRL + X                = Cut selected text / media

CTRL + V                = Paste into post / page

CTRL + F                = Find text

 

CTRL + Z                = Undo

CTRL + Y                = Redo

This is by no means a full list of shortcuts – these are just the ones I use regularly to create posts, get about and find things. Are there any here that are new to you or ones you think I should have included.

Let me know.

What other WordPress issues are you facing? Let me know in the comments and it could very well turn into a post.

Let me know.

 

Planet Simon

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The Geeky Guide to WordPress – Adding blogs and people to your site.

As I’ve been doing this blogging thing a little while now and it seemed a good idea to pass on a few of the things that I’ve learned over the five years that I’ve been doing this. In easy and often geeky steps you’ll be taken through the steps and point out the pitfalls of taking your blog seed and growing it into something really amazing.

 


 

Adding people to your site is a neat little way of helping collaboration between blogs, without having to email or all of the other cumbersome ways to share a post it’s a great way to enable others to write to your site.

One of the other uses of adding people is if you’re running multiple blogs – there’s a lot that can be done by adding them – this post explores how this is done.

Wordpress11

 

By adding a person to a blog they can serve a function for that blog, basically it’s an invite to take part in the blog by either being a follower, author, editor, contributor or administrator.

To add a Person, click on People on the settings for the blog. This is presented to you and put in the user name or email address of the person.

Selection_016

Select the role for that person from the drop. If necessary put in a message and then wait for them to accept. If you are using someone as an admin, make sure you trust them implicitly as they have full access and rights to your site and can even delete it.

With all these different roles to use, it’s easy to see how this feature can add to your blog community, getting your trusted friend see a special post that needs checking, or letting them collaborate on a post or other project.

But what this also means is that if you have blogs about the place you can easily add your main site as admin and use this to run the site, creating posts and adding content. It’s basically as if you’re logged into that blog – but you can’t replay to likes and comments on posts.

So now you know this – what do you think you could use this for? Is this something you knew about before?

What other WordPress issues are you facing?

Let me know.

 

Planet Simon

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Also find Planet Simon on Twitter

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The Geeky Guide to WordPress – Making your Blog Standout, Beautiful and Identifiable

As I’ve been doing this blogging thing a little while now and it seemed a good idea to pass on a few of the things that I’ve learned over the five years that I’ve been doing this. In easy and often geeky steps you’ll be taken through the steps and point out the pitfalls of taking your blog seed and growing it into something really amazing.

 


 

This post is moving more away from the technical to the aesthetic and how as bloggers we can make our posts and pages not only look pleasing but give them a unique look and feel.

To give an idea of the kinds of thing you’re looking at these are some examples of personalised images I’ve used in featured images to grab the poor unsuspecting blogger into my web:

 

 

Here is a bit of a mix up of ideas and some things have worked better than others. At first I was using Power Point to create these and it was pretty good for doing it I have to say. But after a while I began learning about Canva. Canva is an online picture content creation tool (www.canva.com), using either the provided stock pictures or by uploading your own to create headers, covers, templates etc…

Many of Canva’s stock pictures are free but of course many aren’t but are reasonably priced. With this and the graphics tools available these kinds of headers can be created and they help identify you, the blog and the content of the post at a glance.

 


 

Tips

With this I have some tips for creating your blog graphics:

  1. Don’t put your blog address on – If it changes you’ve got a lot of work to do replacing it.
  2. Do put on what the individual blog post is about – This will help with pinning and advertising on social media.
  3. Give it an individual look – Make it sing out your blog.
  4. Make it stand out, either with the image or with colours.

 

These aren’t rules – as the pirates say they’re mor like guidelines but from my experince this work for me. As always make it work for you. I hope this has been useful, if there are any WordPress things that upset or confuse you, let me know. Maybe I can help and maybe there’s a blog post in it!

 

Planet Simon

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Also find Planet Simon on Twitter

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The Geeky Guide to WordPress – Managing the blogs you follow

As I’ve been doing this blogging thing a little while now and it seemed a good idea to pass on a few of the things that I’ve learned over the five years that I’ve been doing this. In easy and often geeky steps you’ll be taken through the steps and point out the pitfalls of taking your blog seed and growing it into something really amazing.

 


 

Follow Settings

When you first start out blogging you want to find out who’s what in the bloggin world and you kind of end up following nearly everyone, at least that’s what I did and don’t get me wrong it’s not a bad thing and you my bloggies are a great bunch. But sometimes you want to manage what it is you see.

Selection_014

In your reader view there’ a manage button on your followed sites, when you click on it you get a view kind of like this:

Selection_015

Here there is a little treasure trove of things you can do, yes you can unfollow from here but it’s not just about this – it’s about following those blogs you love more closely.

1) You can get notified whenever a blogger posts something.

2) You can get emails on their posts which can be whenever they post or a daily / weekly digest.

3) You can get emails on their comments. Useful at times but perhpas also slightly stalker-ish.

With this simple little tool you can really keep up on those blogs that post the interesting stuff and people you love to read.


 

Focussing your Reader

 

When you’re on the WordpRess reader, how does the strem look? Are you looking to get lost in someone’s thoughts on a fantasy book or the next vegan recipe tip? All you can see are humourous cartoons of political satire and someone’s trip to the Seychelles?  To cure this there’s this next little trick – Lists.

Selection_014

On the reader page below where the followed sites are managed is the lists function. Click on this, create a new list and then add the blogs that you want to see in the list.

This is a pretty neat way of selecting what blogs you’re seeing at any one time and allows you to keep up with the ones you love most. So far I’ve only got one list and it needs updating but I can imagine that a few lists are useful.

 


 

What are the issue you have with managing blogs? Do you have a question on WordPress and how to use it? Let me know your thoughts on this and the other posts in the Geeky Guide to WordPress series.

 

Planet Simon

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Also find Planet Simon on Twitter

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The Geeky Guide to WordPress – Scheduling Posts

As I’ve been doing this blogging thing a little while now and it seemed a good idea to pass on a few of the things that I’ve learned over the five years that I’ve been doing this. In easy and often geeky steps you’ll be taken through the steps and point out the pitfalls of taking your blog seed and growing it into something really amazing.


 

Scheduling is a really useful tool for bloggers, it means that posts can be planned days, weeks, months or even (if a blogger wants to) years in advance. Reasons for scheduling include:

  • Publishing a post relevant to another part of the world at a time relevant to them.
  • Publishing a post relevant to an event.
  • Publishing posts at times when the blogger isn’t able to.

What this means is that this simple little feature can give the blogger the power to publish when they want for whatever reason. Your blogging followers can catch up with new material and you may be away on holiday at work or anything else.

At first this feature confused and upset me and it was all going wrong, looking back at the time the WordPress scheduled feature didn’t take into account summer times. Fortunately it’s much easier now, but be warned I have noticed that they keep messing with this. So it might not stay the same for long.

Publishing with the Schedule Function

Up on the top right there’s the publish button. Once upon a time all it did was publish right away, now it does more. To schedule, create your beautiful lovely post and then hit publish.

Schedule1

 

This useful little thing appears in the top right of the screen, click on the Publish Immediately drop down and then you will see this:

Schedule2

From here the publish time and date can be set, where a circle is around a date there are posts already published or scheduled. When the mouse arrow hovers over any of these the posts(s) being published that day are shown with a time so the right time can be chosen.

Next click on the hours and minutes and set the time, don’t forget to choose between AM or PM. If when you type the hours number in you use 24hr format, this does choose the right AM or PM for you which is quite nice.

So that’s scheduling down, pop by next week to see what’s next. What are the things that you face with WordPress? What do you find hard to get your head around?

Planet Simon

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Also find Planet Simon on Twitter

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The Geeky Guide to WordPress – Pingbacks and how they work

As I’ve been doing this blogging thing a little while now and it seemed a good idea to pass on a few of the things that I’ve learned over the five years that I’ve been doing this. In easy and often geeky steps you’ll be taken through the steps and point out the pitfalls of taking your blog seed and growing it into something really amazing.


 

Pinbacks – this is where one blogger creates a link to another bloggers page or post. The useful thing about this is that the host (i.e. the page or post being linked to) blogger is informed about this, hence the term pingback.

It seems there’s confusion and distress about how to make pingbacks work, so being the helpful chap I am this post is going to help you guys create pingbacks that work and show you some of the uses for them.

 

Creating a Pingback

This is dead easy when you understand a couple of points, you’re essentially making a hyperlink to another bloggers page or post, not their main site. For example if you created a pingback to my mainpage https://sfarnell.wordpress.com/ I would not know anything about this, it wouldn’t show up on my notifications, it might show up something if I looked carefully at my stats page but really nothing that shouts at me.

Let’s create a pingback to my Manic Monday post, hit the insert / edit link button

 

Hyperlink

If I now put this:

https://sfarnell.wordpress.com/2018/05/21/manic-monday-number-19-what-do-i-do-now/

in both the URL and Link Text fields (because why not and don’t forget to tick the Open link in a new window / tab)  Add Link and the hyperlink is there.

When the post with this link on it is published I will get a beautiful, lovely pingback.

That’s it.


 

Using Pingbacks

Pingbacks are used to highlight or assign credit when using another bloggers work. It’s polite and nice to do this becasue if referring to someone else’s work it’s generally good manners to do this and the blogger is openly told when this is done.

Pingbacks are also a great way of notifying another blogger of something. It’s like you’re tagging them so for those who take part in awards and tags this is great also if you’re working in some kind of collaboration with one or more other bloggers.

Now you know – the mystery of pingbacks solved. Try it and let me know how you get on.

 

Planet Simon

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Also find Planet Simon on Twitter

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The Geeky Guide to WordPress – Creating Hyperlinks

As I’ve been doing this blogging thing a little while now and it seemed a good idea to pass on a few of the things that I’ve learned over the five years that I’ve been doing this. In easy and often geeky steps you’ll be taken through the steps and point out the pitfalls of taking your blog seed and growing it into something really amazing.


 

Adding a Hyperlink

In the blogging world we might want to create a link to another post in our blog or to some other material elsewhere, this is done by creating hyperlinks. In case anyone reading this needs to know, a hyperlink is a link to some other part of the internet, a shortcut if you like, in a blog post they usually appear as blue text.

Needless to say as with everything else in the blogging world there are some guides to hyperlinks.

Wordpress8

Firstly how to create a hyperlink, there’s two ways here, either highlight some text or just click on the hyperlink button. This is on the toolbar between the quotes button and the numbered list button.

Hyperlink

This window pops up, the only thing that changes is if text was selected this will appear in the Link Text box. If we keep this simple it’s best, copy the web address from the website that the hyperlink will go to and paste (CTRL + C to copy CTRL + P to paste) it into the URL box.

Alternatively as it can be seen in the image WordPress help to link to posts and pages in your blog and it’s searchable. Select the desired post or page.

Now we click ok right? Hang on – this is the bit I’m bad at and it’s where there’s a little trick. Near the top there’s a tick box. Open Link in new window / tab looks a bit boring but it has a purpose. Click on this before pressing Add Link. The reason for this is that it opens the link in a new tab in the reader’s browser, keeping your blog page open.

Now you think I’ve gone mad – but no. We want to try and keep a reader on our page and reading our stuff right, so this lets them read the link but keeps  the original post open. This keeps them on your site longer and maybe looking at more stuff. It’s the little things you see.


 

Adding a Hyperlink to an Image

I’ve had mixed success at this, that’s just a little disclaimer here. I don’t know why but sometimes it works and sometimes it doesn’t. But to do it add an image from the media library. When the image is added select it and then click on the hyperlink button and this should turn up.

Hyperlink image

Notice that the link text is gone, but add the URL to the site or select the post from the list as before, make sure the Open link in new window / tab box is checked and then Add Link.

This should do it… but like I say it hasn’t always worked for me.

So there’s hyperlinks, were there any surprises in there for you? What experiences have you had with hyperlinks that were maybe not what you expected?


 

Another Geeky Guide to WordPress will be out next week, let me know if there’s something you would like covered or something mystifies you about WordPress. It takes a while to learn this and I nearly gave up, so don’t panic if you don’t get it.

 

Planet Simon

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Also find Planet Simon on Twitter

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The Geeky Guide to WordPress – Understanding your Stats

As I’ve been doing this blogging thing a little while now and it seemed a good idea to pass on a few of the things that I’ve learned over the five years that I’ve been doing this. In easy and often geeky steps you’ll be taken through the steps and point out the pitfalls of taking your blog seed and growing it into something really amazing.


 

Every new blogger at some points looks to the the stats page and wonders… What the hell does this all mean? Let me do my best to help, I say I’ll do my best becasue some things I will be honest still confuse me.

Traffic

Looking at the traffic tab we can see a nice graph with hopefully lots of views, or maybe not. It doesn’t matter. The bar chart is showing you the views your page has received on that day in the light blue and the dark blue shows the number of visitors. The visitors display can be turned off to just show the views with a tick box at the top right.

The day highlighted can be changed by choosing another day and at the bottom will breakdown the day into views, visitors, likes and comments by the numbers.

 

Wordpress_Stats1

Scroll down and there’s more:

Posts and pages shows where the views have gone to how many views per post / page.

Referrers shows where the views have come from – i.e. the WordPress reader, Twitter etc..

Countries shows a breakdown of the views according to the country they’re in.

 

Wordpress_Stats2

Even further down where I havent shown are the search terms that were used to find your content, Authors (if there are more than one on your blog) and links where others have linked to your posts or pages.

These statistics are a powerful tool, It’s showing you what’s being viewed, where they’re viewing it from and how many are viewing your content and gives a guide for how many views there are per visitor. For those that are trying to get their message out it’s giving the information to help with your blogging strategy.

For everyone else, yeah this is cool.

 


 

Insights

If we now look at the insights tab we get a whole new level of information:

Blog Insights

We’ve now got information on blogging activity, all time views, followers, commentors. There’s a list of total number of posts, visitors, likes and lots more… I think I remember coming up with something there wasn’t a stat for once but I can’t remember what that was and I don’t think it was that important.


 

It takes a while to work out what all the stats mean and maybe even longer to work out how to use them to your advantage. For myself and maybe other bloggers this is really a look see to what’s going on and sometimes when things aren’t right or to work out really when is best to post. For me the key thing I worked out from this is that posting on a weekend gets you very few initial views and Sunday is a dead day.

But I also worked out that the US is a big source of views, if you want to target this hot bed of traffic then for me in the UK it’s best to post later, or if I want bloggers in the UK to see these posts then I have time time it with lunch hours, evening after dinner or such like.

What about you bloggies? What have you learned from your stats or what still eludes you?

Planet Simon

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Also find Planet Simon on Twitter

Come and visit find me on my Planet Simon Facebook Page

Find some of my pictures on Instagram

Also look me up on: Pinterest      Stumbledupon     Wattpad

 

The Geeky Guide to WordPress – Creating an About page

As I’ve been doing this blogging thing a little while now and it seemed a good idea to pass on a few of the things that I’ve learned over the five years that I’ve been doing this. In easy and often geeky steps you’ll be taken through the steps and point out the pitfalls of taking your blog seed and growing it into something really amazing.


 

Writing an about was for me quite a hard thing to do – it basically where as a blogger you’re telling the world about you – or at least the bit you want to share about you, your blog and you should be selling yourself and telling the blog-o-sphere why it is that they should follow you.

 

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Don’t underestimate this – the About page IS important. When I see blogs and decide who it is I’m going to follow I WILL look at the about page. I don’t tend to follow blogs that don’t have an about page or if their about page is the template that WordPress gives you. It’s not a hard and fast rule but it’s something I look for and I know other bloggers are the same. I want to know who the blogger is, where they’re from, what they do and what they’re about.

Try and think of it like this, essentially we want bloggers to follow us. Clicking the follow button is a bit like a sales transaction, you’re saying “I’m buying into this blog”. So if there’s no about the blogger doesn’t know what they’re buying into. So create one at least, make it big, bold, subtle quiet, thoughtful… make it whatever you are so that when bloggers are looking you up. They know what they’re buying.

 


 

I’m not saying I have the perfect recipe or anything becasue I’m no expert but if you look at my about page I’ve made it me. Kind of random, spacey and science fiction with some scribblings about what I’m about and what you can expect. I’ve got some visually catching  stuff in there and unfortunately a mugshot too (you might want to gloss over that).

 

 

But from all of that it should be clear quite quickly to the reader of what I’m about, what I look like and that I’m some weird geek and I’ve given them every chance to run off!

 


 

So if you don’t have an about page – create one if you have – look at it. What’s it saying about you? Does it need freshening up?

What do you think an about page needs to have?

 

Planet Simon

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Also find Planet Simon on Twitter

Come and visit find me on my Planet Simon Facebook Page

Find some of my pictures on Instagram

Also look me up on: Pinterest      Stumbledupon     Wattpad